Hrm 240 Script for Orienting New Employees

Final Project: Script for Orienting New Employees
HRM/240
March 24, 2012Novonda Lilly
Axia College of University of Phoenix

We are excited to have you as part of our team. You were hired because we believe you can contribute to the success of our business and share our commitment to achieving the goals of our mission statement (“Employee Handbook: Introduction”, 2012) — Dedicated to Growing and Protecting the Assets of Our Clients.
Our organization is committed to unparalleled service in all aspects of our business. As part of the team, we hope you will discover that the pursuit of excellence is a rewarding aspect of your career here (“Employee Handbook: Introduction”, 2012.) You are an integral part of the success of this organization. We are counting on you to do your job and do it well!
It is our hope that, through a better understanding of our organization and its programs, you will be able to align your personal goals with those of our team. In doing so, we can all succeed together. This creates a win-win situation.
The employee handbook is your personal reference to the policies and practices of our firm. In designing our handbook, we have attempted to balance our goals with the importance of meeting your basic needs of good working conditions and a sense of accomplishment in your work.
We, in HR, feel that it is important to address some sensitive issues during your early employment with our company. We have put in-force workplace policies and standards of conducts referenced in your employee handbook. Unlawful harassment and sexual harassment will not be tolerated within our organization. We promote a productive and safe working environment and have a zero tolerance regarding verbal or physical conduct by an employee, client, vendor, or others that harass or disrupt performance within our organization. Please reference our employee handbook for the definition of unlawful and sexual harassment and policies. Our organization also prohibits retaliation against any individual who reports discrimination, harassment, or participates in this behavior of any sort.
Privacy is another sensitive issue within our workplace. Our organization guarantees fair treatment regarding employee??™s right to privacy. No employee should have any expectation of privacy as to his/her e-mail activity, Internet activity, voice mail, local computer files, files on network drives, data stored in Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), Black Berries or cell phones, or any other electronic communication systems that are the property of our organization or linked to our network in any form. The privilege of accessing the Internet from our organization is given for conducting business. However, surfing for personal use can be conducted but only during breaks and non-business hours. Supervisors are responsible for instructing employees on the proper use of the communication services used by the firm for both internal and external business communications to include Internet usage.
Employees are to refrain from excessive personal call during the workday. We realize that sometimes personal calls cannot be avoided. Please use discretion when using company phones and personal cell phones for personal use. Cell phones should not be used during meetings, unless the call relates to the meeting. Employees are expected to put their cell phones on vibrate during the day and during meetings. Additionally, because phone conversations can be disruptive to fellow coworkers, employees are requested to refrain from walking through the halls while talking on cell phones. Cellular devices that interfere with the company??™s electronics are prohibited.

References:

Bohlander, G. W., & Snell, S. A., (2007). Managing human resources (14th ed.). Florence, KY: Thomson Learning Higher Education.
Employee Handbook: Introduction. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.smallbusinessnotes.com/managing-your-business/employee-handbook-introduction.html
HR360. (2011 – 2012). Employee Handbook Guide. Retrieved from http://www.hr360.com/Recruitment-and-Hiring/New-Employees/Onboarding/Employee-Handbook-Guide.aspx
Smith, W. P., & Tabak, F. (2009). Monitoring Employee E-mails: Is There Any Room for Privacy Academy Of Management Perspectives, 23(4), 33-48. doi:10.5465/AMP.2009.45590139

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *